Yellow Pages |   News Updates |   Events Calendar |   Movie Times | Recycling  |   Document Shredding
Rocklin & Roseville Today Events
Celebrating 14 Years Online
HOME

Carbon Pollution Limits Can Help Save Lives and Improve Health




Few things are more frightening for a parent than racing to the hospital with a child who can't breathe.

Few things are more difficult for a physician than telling a family that a loved one will not recover from an asthma attack. We work with people who know those experiences far too well and -because of those experiences- support reducing carbon pollution.

The American Lung Association and the American Thoracic Society members and volunteers understand the impact of polluted air. We know that, as a nation, we have to do more to protect the ability of people to breathe, and that requires us to reduce carbon pollution from power plants.

It isn't enough for physicians to educate patients about the health risks of air pollution, and for parents to keep their children with asthma indoors on bad air days. We must reduce pollution before it takes a further toll on our children and families.

As a nation, we have cut air pollution by over 70 percent since 1970, but today more than 147 million Americans (nearly half of the U.S. population) still live where the air is unhealthy to breathe.  Warmer temperatures from climate change will make it even harder to reduce air pollution in many places, and increase the likelihood of drought, wildfires and other threats to our health.

Fortunately, we can fight those threats.

Recently, hundreds of people attended public hearings hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Denver, Atlanta, Pittsburgh and Washington, DC to speak out in support of the proposed Clean Power Plan to place first-ever limits on power plant carbon pollution. They spoke up because they recognize that reducing carbon pollution benefits the health of communities across the nation. 

The EPA's Clean Power Plan provides states with tools to reduce the carbon pollution from power plants by 30 percent, moving us forward in the fight against climate change. But the plan would do more than that. When fully implemented, the carbon reduction plan will also reduce lethal air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide and mercury by 25 percent, preventing up to 6,600 premature deaths and 150,000 asthma attacks in children each year.  The plan would also help prevent heart attacks, hospital admissions and missed days of work or school due to illness.
Public health experts call this prevention. For the rest of us, it's just simple common sense. 

That is why both our organizations support efforts of the EPA to establish national limits on carbon pollution.  If we, as a nation, act responsibly now to reduce carbon pollution we can simultaneously improve our air quality now and prevent many of the adverse health and environmental impacts for future generations.

Contributed by Harold P. Wimmer, National President and CEO, American Lung Association, and Thomas Ferkol, MD, President, American Thoracic Society





Placer County News Headlines

Placer County's New Committee for Lodging Tax FundingAuburn, CA, - Lodging taxes collected from overnight guests in eastern Placer County have long been allocated for local, visitor-serving projects to benefit its tourism-based economy

Placer Public Health Laboratory Seeks Cost Effective FutureAuburn, CA, - Placer County will seek a more sustainable model for public health laboratory services, with a recent vote by the Board of Supervisors allowing staff to move forward

World Renowned Neonatologist to Lead Pediatrics Dept. at UC Davis(Sacramento, Calif.)-Satyan Lakshminrusimha, a world renowned neonatologist, has been named chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the UC Davis School of Medicine

In Cancer, Talking About Bad News Can Be Good(Sacramento, Calif.) - Giving bad news is never easy, especially when it's life or death. But when an oncologist delivers a poor prognosis to a cancer patient, does it harm their relationship?

Folsom City Council Picks Mayor and Vice MayorFolsom, CA - The Folsom City Council unanimously selected Steve Miklos as mayor and Ernie Sheldon as vice mayor at the Dec. 12 City Council meeting

Roseville Paying 20 Percent More for ThisRoseville, CA, - Roseville gas prices dipped again slightly this past week offering motorists a slight reprieve since the gas tax went into effect on November 1

263,000 Acres Already Torched in Southern California FiresCalifornia Fire Updates 2017: Over 9,000 firefighters remain on the line, successfully making progress in containment of several of the fires that sparked last week in southern California

WinterWonderGrass Music and Brew Festival Tickets On SaleOlympic Valley, Calif., - Silhouetted against the snowy Sierra Nevada, WinterWonderGrass Festival returns for its 4th year at Squaw Valley Alpine Meadows with headlining artists

TobyMac Tour Coming to Sacramento and RenoSacramento,CA, - Seven-time GRAMMY winner TobyMac will once again bring his dynamic "HITS DEEP Tour" to 29 markets next year, alongside a talent-packed line up

Gold Country Wildlife Rescue Seeks Volunteers and InternsAUBURN - Gold Country Wildlife Rescue is seeking the assistance of dedicated individuals to help support animals in need.

All-new Volkswagen Atlas a roomy SUVRoseville, CA,- Looking to fill what it considered a void in its sport utility vehicle offerings, Volkswagen developed the 2018 Atlas.

Lower Cost Electricity Anticipated for Some Placer County ResidentsPLACER COUNTY, CA - In December, residents and businesses will receive the first of several notices informing them about the coming change in their electric energy supply


NEWS: In Case You Missed It